Lithuanian Website Translation

History of the internet in Lithuania

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Also, Lithuanian Christian names are different than the recorded English ones: As such, the numbers of hobbyist websites boomed. Contacting the archives in Lithuanian. Peter Paul Rakauskas, Jr. Which regions would you recommend for best sense of rural traditional life? We offer tailor-made tours to every Lithuanian city or town on request, including Salantai. Michael Rakus and Mary Switsavage.

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They also provide lively comment sections, traditionally the most popular online locations to discuss. The top Lithuanian internet portals are Delfi. Some portals Delfi, Alfa are the sole business of the respective companies, while others were established by media companies TV3 moved in from TV business and Lrytas from newspapers.

There are also "specialized portals" which provide similar information on some particular topic. The largest among those is Vz. Others may be less popular but altogether their traffic form a significant part of the Litnet, as Lithuanian internet is sometimes called. The most popular topics include sports basketball, football, F1 and child rearing. Many of the specialized portals have been started by hobbyists but later bought out by the main internet portals and effectively serve as subsites e.

As merely 3 million people speak Lithuanian worldwide, the number of available websites in Lithuanian language is generally smaller than in larger languages. As such, the users who seek more specialized knowledge sometimes revert to foreign websites. These are either Russian or English as those two foreign languages are the most popular. However, as Russian speakers are mostly older, the non-Lithuanian-language web traffic is more evenly divided among English and Russian websites.

This includes the top Russian-language search Yandex. Lithuanian-Russian-English keyboards are the most common keyboards sold in Lithuania. The letters of the English, Lithuanian, and Russian layouts are all marked, so it would be easy to use the same keyboard for typing all three languages.

Also popular in Lithuania are the local pirate websites, providing torrents Linkomanija. Unlike in the West, most pirate websites in Lithuania are paid, earning money by selling the stolen content for a fraction of the price of "original". They even provide added value in the form of original Lithuanian translations of otherwise untranslated films. The ability or will of Lithuanian authorities to combat these websites has been limited so far.

Despite them being both easily accessible and owned by Lithuanians, little initiative is made to close them down. All this, as well as the language barrier, make the international pirate websites rather unpopular in Lithuania. Likewise, the legal ways to get music or films online e. Netflix are nearly unknown in Lithuania. Other global websites that enjoy less popularity in Lithuania than in the West include LinkedIn and Twitch.

In Lithuania, the internet was slower to start than in the West. As Lithuania was occupied by the Soviet Union until , PCs were effectively banned and not available in the s. Yes, my dates are correctly set before WWI. Do you know the names of the towns where I could start looking based on my story?

Click here for a map of interwar Lithuania. Thank you for sharing the link. Many many thanks, brenda. I am very much interested in the area of Beinoraiciai also known as Beinoraiciu, my grandfather was born there in During that time, what was the land like, what would people have done for a living?

What would of made my grandfather leave there in ? For introduction I suggest reading our page on the Lithuanian history click here , especially the chapters on Russian Imperial rule and independence to better understand the era and its aspirations.

Basically Russians decided to leave Lithuania as an undeveloped agricultural land due to its border proximity.

Most Lithuanians of s were peasants and would grow food for living. Thank you so much, the articles have helped me so much to understand Lithuanian history.

My grandfather came to the US and joined the Army and went back and fought for the Lithuanians. Lithuanian nature indeed still looks the same. The people, their aspirations and lifestyle differ however. As Russia left Lithuania undeveloped choosing an urban life meant emigration whether to Riga, St. Today it is different with urban life being more prestigious and villagers viewed in dismay by some; the youth leave the villages hoping never to return.

Like in the USA technology was one of the drives for this change. However another drive was the Soviet occupation when nearly all land was nationalized and the land-owning peasants killed or expelled, religion attacked.

Urbanization rate increased from 30 to 70 percent as more emphasis was put on heavy industry while the productivity of agriculture suffered as people no longer a bond to the land when it was not even theirs; some would get addicted to alcohol which is still a problem in villages.

After independence restoration the land was returned to descendants, however, many of them now live elsewhere and are no longer farmers, therefore they sell or rent the land. This Soviet era also greatly villages architecturally with many old homes destroyed and new ones built on standard plain designs including apartment blocks which never previously existed in villages.

I have enjoyed your website very much. It is quite interesting to read the history and how it has influenced what is occuring today. I am only begining to research my Lithuanian grandparents emingration to Chicago in I am trying to determine possible motiviation factors for their emigration. My grandfather was a construction engineer according to family lore and founded a construction company shortly after arriving in Chicago.

I explain the economic situation at the time in answers above to Debbie Cassey. Thank you so much for your help. I was able to contact the Lithuanian Archives, hopefully they will be able to find some information for me.

All my people are from the Panevezys area. Please keep up the good work. With Much appreciation, Paul Alencikas. I am reading a book on genealogy, and it talks about first name patterns in Scotland and Italy. I was wondering if you know of a pattern in the Lithuanian Culture, so many of my family names repeat. This could help in my research. Instead, tradition depended on family and location.

One quite popular historic tradition but never universal would be to name a child after one of the grandparents. In some families one of the sons may have been traditionally named after father.

Do you know of any other way than going through the Natiional Archives to find information on families. I have worked with them for a few years now, and the person who I am working with is not very helpfull. The people in the past would ask questions and they would find the information for me, this person wants exact dates and places, if I had that information, I would not be asking. Should I ask for a new person, or is there any other recourse I can take.

Of course, you can try to ask to contact another person. That said, not every state institution employee is like that, but what you told in the recent post reminds me of this situation. If you are interested, contact me by e-mail augustinas. Of course, there is never a guarantee that particular information will be in the archives — some wooden churches have burnt down destroying the birth and marriage records and so on.

Thank you very much for your offer of help. I am going to gather all my information on my family and I will contact your office. It is the best to learn as much as you could from what you have: With this info one could search the archives.

As for the language various diaspora institutions offer courses of Lithuanian language or may help you find a teacher — contact the nearest Lithuanian organization the local chapter of Lithuanian community, etc. Global True Lithuania website may help you find local Lithuaian institutions. Thank Augustinas for your hard work and dedication. As you have mentioned get as much actual documentation as possible.

But there is a very large disappointing factor that will sometimes come to bear. I found your website and am a consistent user. My maternal grandparents were from Lithuania and migrated in and My wife and I visited for 8 days in September and we left promising to return.

Thanks for your website it reminds us of what we saw and hope to at a future time. I was told she came to the US from Lithuania. ALso, I was given Butkas as a last name too. I am trying to find out more about my great and great great grandparents who were born in Lithuania. She was born in a place called Ezushula, which I cannot find on a map or on the internet. Susannah married a man named Joesph Ciroski but I believe that is the Polish version of his surname.

They immigrated to the USA in through the port of Riga. I can help you! My great-grandparents were Susannah Shemukenas and Josef Cerosky.

My great-great grandmother was Anna Vedderis. What a great website. We will be visiting Lithuania in September and would love to meet up with relatives. Do you have a recommendation of a specific researcher at the State Archives with contact information. My grandmother, Stephania Asporas, came from Birzai around Thank you for your help. Usually the State Archives should be contacted directly as an institution and they can do a search for a fee.

However, we may provide the services of: Contacting the archives in Lithuanian. Consulting on what documents will be needed. Reconstructing the likely information before the archive search as, for example, city, town and personal names are often changed in US documents so knowledge of Lithuanian is needed to guess what were the original names.

Other consulting regarding what, where and when to search. Hello, my name is Debbie Smith. I am living in hope that I may find my Great Grandfathers family. His name was John August Herman Boyer.

The spelling of Boyer over the years has altered I believe but still unsure of original spelling. John August Herman Boyer spelling variations Born , unknown as to where born Was last known in Memel now Klaipedia in c when he left and emigrated overseas.

He finally arrived in New Zealand c — All I know is that his father no known name was a Bricklayer. There is No Mothers or Fathers names mentioned anywhere in any documents, nor do they offer up any other information about locations or siblings.

I am sadly at a loss and there is no other recourse here for me. I was fortunate to have a fellow friend search on Ancestry and below is all she could tell me.

Also some Boyars, again from Kaunas. A few from Vilnius, but not many. By search on Ancestry do you mean ancestry. In general, archive search would be more definite as far from everything is available online, especially from outside USA. That said, the situation is not that easy as very little is known. In such cases its somewhat hit-or-miss affair, but if there is luck it is possible to find something in archives. Hi Augustinas, thank you so much for your reply. Your suggestions and info is appreciated.

Yes, it seems for me a needle in a hay stack kind of search. The person here in New Zealand who looked up on the ancestry. And that was all they could help me with. Only of course if this is not to time consuming of you. In general, the existance of people with such surname now is doubtful.

This is not a Lithuanian surname. Or the original surname may have been non-German and now the family may have a Lithuanian surname. I am not able to find where my great grandfather came from on line. It states the area as Vilna Wilno and then specifically Kagaschin.

It is in cursive writing and spelled twice. No search comes up with it. He spoke Polish and i believe was of Catholic descent. Was there a place called Kagaschin in Wilno? I amnot sure exactly, it would help id you know a more precise area.

Kaip tau anis Augustinas. My grand farther came to the US in his parents were German he was born in near Kaunas his father owned a grain mill. Depending on the information you have, we may do an archive search to learn what exactly property did they have and then we could determine if that mill still exists.

Switsavage Last name could be a bit different due to translation errors during immigration and etc. She was married to a Micheal Mykolas? On April 15, , Max wrote about his quest to find information on this great-grandparents: Michael Rakus and Mary Switsavage.

Any information about Michael will perhaps lead me to a greater knowledge of Mathias. In your reply to Max, you mentioned archive search services. Would I be able to avail myself of them? Please let me know. I am interested in tracing Mathias back to Lithuania and discovering there his immediate family.

Hello, On your website http: I would like to contact them for a future visit, could you please give me their email? Best regards, Erik Martensson Sweden.

I am trying to find some information and documents of my grand grand father, who as born in Kaunas, around He migrated to Brazil in Can you help me? If it is possible, please send me an email. Hello, can you help me? I look for information about my grandfather jurgis bucholcas he was born in vilkaviskis in I sent an email to the Lithuanian archive and they informed me that he does not have these papers, is it possible that they do not have documents?

Is bucholcas a common name in Lithuania? Dear Marjorie, There are various possibilities.

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51 rows · See the top most popular websites in Lithuania by SimilarWeb metrics - ranking, traffic and engagement stats. Lithuania celebrates a Centenary of the Restoration of the State. Read the news from Lithuania and around the world, learn about Lithuania’s culture and tourism, discover business opportunities, and find out interesting facts about living in Lithuania. Top Sites in Lithuania The sites in the top sites lists are ordered by their 1 month Alexa traffic rank. The 1 month rank is calculated using a combination of average daily visitors and pageviews over the past month. The site with the highest combination of visitors and pageviews is ranked #1.